Tweets Posted in January @MontyLarkin

I thought I would try to list stories that I have read and posted on my Twitter account –  (@MontyLarkin).  What I consider important or pertinent stories I have put in bold.

Jan 2  Are your ‘plastic’ clothes polluting the ocean?

Link between fungicides and bees.

China shuts down ivory imports

UK gov reckons on no rise in electric vehicles?

Jan 3  Making room for wildlife in an urbanized world.

Farmers could increase bird populations.

Lack of English hen harriers.

The real T. rex. Chris Packham.

Wildflower planting boosts farmland birds.

China to restrict import UK plastics.

‘Unofficial’ rights of way under threat.

Increasing humidity a serious threat associated with climate change.

Stamp duty break a false economy.

Soil erosion on farmland.

Flowers in bloom on Jan 1.

Tax and reduce use of plastics.

Butterfly Conservation work parties in Sussex.

Green generation produced triple the amount from coal in 2017.

UK public wildly wrong on what Britain looks like.

Sea level rise worse than thought?

‘Clean’ farmed fish has hidden problems.

Higher temps linked to EU asylum figures.

Fight against deadly wheat disease.

Woodland grant scheme just opened.

Trump – well say no more!

Plastics being shipped to India.

Shell plc entering household energy market.

Flaw in EU renewable energy plans.

Risk to wild orchids.

Increase in number of storms hitting UK.

City with 16,000 electric buss’s!

Jan 4  Gove’s speech on future of farming/countryside (A number of).

Roadside litter regs announced.

Half of new cars in Norway are electric or hybrid.

Beachy Head lighthouse construction.

Jan 5  Humane slaughter  project.

Bristol Freighter aircraft returns to UK.

Jan 6  Water shortage in SE England.

Jan 8  Wild ponies in US campaign.

Tanker on fire off China.

New Northern Forest; source of trees?

Judi Dench and trees.

Jan 10/11  California mudslide.

Rampion Wind Farm cable link across South Downs.

Jan 11 Governments 25 year enviro plan.  (A number of).

Cronyism in government?

Rise in sale of reusable coffee cups.

Wrapped coconuts!

Norwegian PM says jobs in combating climate.

First vertical forest in low-income housing.

New York to sue oil companies.

Farage and new EU referendum?

EU fishing quotas will stay in transition period.

Wherabouts of continents in 50M years?

July Sightings

July 4.  Flock of about 20 oystercatchers perched on one of the reefs that run out here and there along the beach at St.Leonards this afternoon.

July 8.  Trained to Brighton…  Beautiful show of hollyhocks at Berwick station, real cottage flowers!  Scrub is still being allowed to increase in area at a number of locations along the Firle Escarpment Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).  This is one of SE England’s major landscape features and if attitudes, government grants, and funding for Natural England staff do not change before too long, this majestic view will be lost to future generations.    In a field near Firle, saw windrows of straw from an early combined crop of cereal.    People who criticise on aesthetic grounds the Rampion wind farm some 10 miles seaward of Brighton, should turn their gaze 90 degrees and consider the factory chimney (aka i-360 attraction), parked on Brighton’s promenade!    Evening withdrawal of some evening train services meant I was stuck on Lewes station for about an hour from 8-45pm but I was rewarded by one of Nature’s spectacles.  I became aware of lots of jackdaw chatter emanating some 200m away in trees in Southover Road.  Over the next hour, wave upon wave of jackdaws came in low over the station from the south-east, many beginning to chatter on their final approach to their companions already settled amongst the crowns of the tall trees. I was left wondering how they all managed to fit into the the available space. Home at 22-45!

July 9.  Sensible dogs, and Englishmen go out in the midday sun!  Why sit on baking-hot pebbles when you can lay on cool, damp ones or even better, in the water!

July 14.  Buff-tailed bumble bees bottoms-up on artichokes on my allotment.

July 19.  during the evening, I counted some 20-24 swifts over the centre of St.Leonards.  Another couple of weeks and I guess they’ll have largely departed south.

Storm Angus

Storm Angus.  Well, after a night of listening to the wind in the trees and the rain lashing down, I received text at 6-30am from my colleague Sally saying as she lives not too far away, she’d go and check the electric fencing on the 3 coastal pony grazing sites near Beachy Head.  7-30, she text to say she’d sorted the battered fences at Frances Bottom.  8-30am and another text, saying that the cliff top fence at Shooters Bottom towards Belle Tout was in one hell of a mess, so I phoned and said I’d set set-off immediately to assist her.  This fence would have taken the full brunt of the storm.

When I arrived on site at 9-30, I’ve not seen electric fencing so blown about, some it in small heaps even with the odd metal stake still attached and within it!  We basically had to untangle the three lines of wire and tape, and re-erect most of the 850 metres of the cliff facing fence, we finishing at about midday.  Conditions were very windy at first and quite cold but at least it was dry.



These two pics I took just before 9-30, before starting work and showing the white surf on the rocks below Belle Tout and the fencing largely laying on the ground.

We then went on to Birling Gap and fortunately Nick the looker there for today is quite practical and he’d turned the power off and had just about finished re-ercting sections by the time we arrived. Fortunately, it usually works that the ponies move away from the wind thus retreating from where the fence is being damaged and where they could get out.  Just for good measure, I then walked the 1700 metres of fencing at Ashdown Forest on the way home.

Statistics.  The shipping forecast was for the possibility of a Force 10 Storm but out at the Greenwich Light Buoy, 20 miles out from the coast off Peacehaven, the maximum wind speed briefly recorded was at 7am and at 75mph, technically into the Force 12 Hurricane zone.  (This, it has to be remembered is over open sea where wind speeds are a little higher).

Erosion of Chalk Cliffs in East Sussex – New Research

Cosmic clue to UK coastal erosion

By Jonathan Amos, BBC Science Correspondent

7 November 2016

Recent centuries have seen a big jump in the rates of erosion in the iconic chalk cliffs on England’s south coast.  A new study finds that for thousands of years the rocks were being beaten back by the waves at perhaps 2-6cm a year.  The past 150 years has seen this retreat accelerate 10-fold, to more than 20cm a year.

The speed-up was clocked with the aid of a smart technique that tracks changes induced in rocks when they are exposed to energetic space particles.

The research, led from the British Geological Survey and conducted by Martin Hurst and colleagues, is reported in the leading American journal, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The group believes the findings will help us understand some of the coming impacts of climate change.  “Our coasts are going to change in the future as a result of sea-level rise and perhaps increased storminess, and we want this work to inform better forecasts of erosion,” Dr Hurst, currently affiliated to Glasgow University, told BBC News.

The research was centred on East Sussex and its towering cliffs at Beachy Head and Hope Gap.

Originally laid down 90 million years ago, these soft chalk faces are now being eaten away by the relentless pounding they get from the sea.cliffs-1Rood and Hurst on the platform.  Image copyrightMARTIN HURST ET AL

Image caption

Care is needed because the platform’s exposure can appear more recent than is really the case.

Dr Hurst’s team was able to estimate the pace of this reversal by examining the amount of beryllium-10 in nodules of flint embedded in the eroded platform in front of the cliffs.  The radioactive element is produced when cosmic rays – that constantly shower the Earth – hit oxygen atoms in the flints’ quartz minerals.  The longer the nodules have been exposed, the greater their build-up of beryllium-10.

At Beachy Head and Hope Gap, the gently sloping platform, which is only uncovered at low tide, extends seaward several hundred metres.  It represents all that is left after millennia of cliff removal.

“The lower rates of erosion that we report – about 2.5cm at Hope Gap and around 6cm at Beachy Head – are averaged over that timeframe – through about the past 7,000 years of the Holocene,” explained Dr Hurst.

“But comparing that to observations based on topographic maps and aerial photography of the last 150 years – the difference is quite stark. These historical observations from 1870 to the present suggest erosion rates of 20-30cm a year at the two sites.”


Flint nodules.  Image copyrightMARTIN HURST ET AL

The team removed flints for beryllium testing in a line perpendicular to the cliffs.  The estimates of change in the deep past are tricky because the platform appears younger than it really is.  This stems from the fact that its surface continues to erode downwards, removing its oldest exposed flints. The regular tidal covering of water also has to be considered because it will restrict the flux of cosmic rays reaching the platform, thus limiting the amount of beryllium that can be induced in the nodules.

But the team is confident in its analysis and puts forward some ideas to explain the recent big up-tick in erosion.  These concern the available gravels at the foot of the cliffs that constitute the beach.  Ordinarily, this material acts as a buffer, limiting the energy of crashing waves.

But there is good evidence that the beaches in this region of the south coast have got thinner through time and perhaps therefore offer less protection today than they once did.  In the modern era, groynes and sea walls have been erected further down the coast and these may have interfered with the along-shore transport of gravels. And further back in time, several hundred years ago, it is possible also that there was a phase of more storms. These could have removed significant volumes of gravel and pushed the rates of erosion into a new, more aggressive regime that persists even now.

Co-author Dr Dylan Rood from Imperial College London told BBC News: “The coast is clearly eroding, and Britain has retreated fast. A nearly tenfold increase in retreat rates over a very short timescale, in geological terms, is remarkable.

“The UK cannot leave the issue of cliff erosion unresolved in the face of a warming world and rising sea levels. Cliff erosion is irreversible; once the cliffs retreat, they are gone for good.”


Birling Gap Observations

A couple of days ago I stopped-off at Birling Gap to have my lunch…

I noticed while standing at the top of the steps that go down to the beach, how grey and course the shingle appeared.  Presumably this indicated that this material is of relatively newly exposed flint.  There was a large cliff-fall mid-way along the Seven Sisters back in the summer which no doubt has contributed,it now completely dispersed by the sea.  Shingle is in the main, of a brownish hue due to exposure over time to iron compounds in the seawater.

Large cliff fall along Seven Sisters during May captured by tourist Wang-Feng.

Large cliff fall along Seven Sisters during May captured by tourist Wang-Feng.

The land to the east of Birling Gap appears much improved from the now regular winter pony grazing.  This week there were still a number of plants still in flower. Scrub clearance by National Trust staff and volunteers has also had a marked effect on this once un-managed area.

A herd of ponies were grazing on Eastbourne BC’s Belle Tout area, the first of the autumn/winter grazing of four sites within the Birling/Beachy Head area this season.


Pony Grazing During February 2016

The frequent occurrence of gales and the odd storm force winds have kept us on our toes this winter with regard to two of the three groups of Exmoor ponies on the coast. These two herds are contained only by electric fencing and the strong winds have put a great deal of strain on these fences.  Due diligence and also being proactive have paid off, with failures being kept to a bare minimum.

Have noticed yet again how hardy and resilient our Exmoor ponies are. I happened to observe a group of the much-vaunted Konik (Konik Polski) ponies grazing on purple moor-grass (Molinia) on another heathland area in SE England.  The overall grazing conditions were very similar to what three groups of our ponies are currently grazing; the body condition between the two was very noticeable.  There could be admittedly other factors at work, but I for one put my money without a hint of doubt on good old British stock!

On a cool but beautifully sunny Thursday (25th), we gathered in Herd 5 which has been carrying out grazing for a month not far from the summit of Beachy Head.  With help from volunteer Laurence and Eastbourne Borough Council’s two estate workers, we very quickly had all 15 ponies gathered and corralled and by early afternoon, all transported off to their next job of work and all the electric fencing taken up.

The only glitch was a failure on my part with the first load, to ‘read’ correctly the clay-with-flint ground conditions at Gayles when the truck, trailer and three ponies forward motion abruptly stopped and sideways motion began! After letting the ponies off and much pondering, I made a sharp sideways turn and went downhill – a rather a nervous moment!

Their new place of work is a return to the National Trust’s recent acquisition of Gayles Farm in the vicinity of the Seven Sisters cliffs. This is a fairly extensive area of chalk grassland where sheep grazing over the past two decades have failed to control the relentless spread of tor grass across these floristically bountiful slopes.  This is likely to be a long-term collaboration with the National Trust.

Week Ending Saturday, November 7th

Monday.  During the afternoon, we gathered-in and corralled the 10 ponies at Shooters Bottom.  These were then trailered up to Lullington Heath to re-join their Herd 2 companions.  The exercise was something of a race as the hours of daylight decrease; luckily the ponies ‘co-operated’ with us, we only having to use headlights to dismantle the corral in the failing light.  Fog or low cloud over the last couple of days has made the lookering of ponies on the high ground of the Ashdown Forest area somewhat tricky.

Wednesday.  The start of several days of wet, dank and often windy weather.  Today saw the 15 ponies of Herd 5 driven from Belle Tout around to Shooters Bottom.  They have done an excellent job on the former site, we having grazed this early in the season so as not to risk compromising the orchid colonies there next year.  We also managed to take up all the electric fencing.

Friday.  While checking the ponies at Shooters Bottom, I noticed that autumn hawkbit, clustered bellflower and common centaury were still in flower.  The temperatures this week have been abnormal with them reaching the upper teens on a daily basis.

Saturday.  The autumn winds of the last two days have ravaged the magnificent autumn tints.  This notable show of colours was due to the trees not being drought-stressed during the summer, few frosts and warm or mild temperatures up to the present time.

Week Ending Saturday, October 3rd.

What a busy week and what fantastic weather to be working in!

Monday.  Continued with the erection of the 1900 metres of electric fencing at Shooters Bottom.  This site has caught me out a little, as there is come autumn, far more grass than I anticipated.  Later in the day, we re-jigged the fencing at the NT’s Blackcap, west of Lewes, in order to facilitate gathering-in of the ponies later this week.

Tuesday.  Moved the 11 remaining ponies at the RSPB’s Broadwater Warren reserve near Eridge down to Belle Tout.  With much appreciated help from the RSPB volunteers, some deft legwork and a helping of smoke and mirrors, we had them corralled.  Our ‘new’ livestock trailer is proving to be a real asset to our work, well designed and providing flexibility to our operations.

Wednesday.  Spent much of the day finishing off the fence at Shooters Bottom.  A lot of interest from members of the public in what we were doing and with the ponies encamped at Belle Tout.

Thursday.  Another long day with carrying out the move of the 10 ponies at Blackcap over to Shooters Bottom.  Eight came down off the Downs easily, Anna and Rj later valiantly managed to coax the remaining two off.  A late finish, what with running into the gridlocked traffic by Lewes on the last return trip.